Walking with the Ranger

We pack our camp and prepare for our walk with the Ranger and our drive to our final park, Tarangire.

The Ranger greets us and leads us along the top of Ngorongoro crater where we have an aerial view of the caldera. He smiles but is a man of no words intent on his task of leading our group. John tells me later that the gun he carried would not have been effective against predators. Good thing we only saw four donkeys!  Good thing John kept this knowledge to himself.

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Kilimanjaro fallout continues to pester as I have no feeling in several toes and each step I’m reminded how much I’ve come to rely on all ten. I wonder if the feeling will ever return, or if this is my new normal?

We arrive back at the Safari vehicle, say goodbye to the Ranger and begin our vehicle climb out of Ngorongoro. It is beautiful, lush and green; a sharp contrast to the dust bowl of the caldera.

We see young Maasai men with their faces painted and heads shaved. Stephen tells us that they have just been circumcised. He further advises that during the surgery the boy receives no medicine and must not move a muscle or cry as this would bring shame to his family. He must be a warrior.  Girls are also circumcised and they are allowed to cry though they must not kick at the knife. It is a harsh coming of age.

We meet up with the Lodge group at our lunch break. It’s always a treat to stop at places where we can shop and have the potential for cold ginger pop or even a cup of brewed coffee. The retail shops and restaurants are set up for Safari folks with their inflated prices and costly brik a brak. We buy only a few trinkets as the shopkeepers are not interested in haggling. A few minutes up the road, Stephen stops to purchase cigarettes for John. He leaves us and instantly the vehicle is surrounded. We are offered sale day pricing for nearly identical merchandise and we happily purchase.  In seconds the word is out and layers of people converge asking, then begging us to buy. The prices drop, we are tempted and buy again, a thick glut surrounds our vehicle and our senses are in overload. Stephen returns and shoos everyone away and we are off.

We continue our journey to Tarangire. We are close as we see a sign with a picture of lions in trees. Stephen tells us we may see this at Lake Manyara, the only place where lions climb trees.  It is believed the they have adapted to get away from the tse tse flies, though this is only one thought. A few moments later we see a small pride of lions in a tree. We watch for some time as the cub tries to find a comfortable position. I wonder if the fire department would attempt a rescue?

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We arrive at our campsite, our last home for the final two nights of our Safari. Our site is next to a dry river bed and the centre is a large baobab tree. It is pretty and somewhat shaded but the neighbours are less than desirable as we step out of the vehicle and begin swatting tse tse flies and bees.

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Our water for washing is thick with bees. This is the end of the dry season and the bees are thirsty. I quickly wash and then throw away the water attempting to redirect the bees from the door to our tent.  We swat constantly and shortly it becomes exhausting. I think if I lived here, I would adapt and wonder if the lions are on to something?  We retreat to the swat free zone of our tent and read before dinner. The situation improves dramatically as night falls and the pests sleep.

I lay awake concerned as our campsite is exposed and we are in the tent farthest from the Guides. I’m in the farther cot and only the canvas separates me from the many predators.  It is at moments like this I wish for the safety of a proper structure. John sleeps well, perhaps he doesn’t want to feel it coming?  I remain alert for both of us until I succumb to sleep and dreams.

Thankful

The night is magical as the stars peak through the canopy of trees above. We sit around the campfire and wait to be called for dinner. I think of our family and the Thanksgiving dinner that will be enjoyed half a world away. There will be too much food and too many choices, thanks difficult due to the sheer abundance of things to be thankful and yet little appreciation. We seem always searching to find thanks in our world of plenty. Tonight our thanks is crystal in its clarity. We have little of our typical comforts and abundance and yet in a small campground in Africa I look to the heavens and give thanks for life, for sight, for love. I am at peace.

Dinner is served and is special as we have all purchased wine and share with each other. Our meal is a simple stew, our mood festive.  The usual fare is extra tasty tonight. We each share what we are thankful for on this night. I’m thankful for John’s understanding, tolerance and love when I’m at my least loveable. We are both thankful for our family and our newest grandson. Collectively, we are thankful for the opportunity to travel, access to clean water and our new friends. We smile at each other under the glow of the camping lights and commit this night to memory.

After dinner we gather again at the campfire, our bellies full, wine in hand and chat. We learn more about each other. Stephen explains the education system in Tanzania. He has two sons, they wear uniforms to school and education is critical to achieving a better life. Our Canadian group talks of the places we would like to visit and what is next on our agendas. Stephen is strangely silent. I ask him if he travels and he tells us that this is not possible. It is not easy for a Tanzanian to travel freely. Many countries are concerned that they will not leave once they arrive. We are silent as we imagine what it would be like to not have this freedom, to have a passport that closed doors. Hussein joins us and we chat about religion. He tells us that his friends and family wonder how he can spend time with us as we are not Muslim. Stephen explains the difference between Muslims and Christians. He says that if a church of Christians are praying and a group of Muslims gather and state that the people in the church are stupid, the Christians would be tolerant. If the opposite were to occur, the Muslims would defend their religion using whatever means was required. Hussein smiled and agreed. It is an interesting glimpse into a different belief system. Its interesting that everyone’s beliefs are so intertwined into the fabric of their being. It is thought provoking to hear another way. We fall silent thinking about the words that have been spoken. On this night, we have solved the word’s problems as we are understanding of differences and not needing or wanting to force change.

We are soon off to bed. We will stay here two nights, and are excited about not needing to pack up tomorrow or drive around aimlessly at the end of the day while Stephen and Hussein shout into the radio at our camp staff, as our camp is not ready, yet again. They speak in Swahili but we have become experts at picking up non verbal cues and listening for the click of Stephen’s tongue and rapid head shake that symbolize his displeasure.

We sleep sound content with our full bellies, wine buzz and knowledge that the Maasai warrior will keep us safe from any predator.